No Contests

No Contests: Why They Worked in the Past but Not Today

A Reoccuring Trend

With Vince McMahon and Bruce Prichard creating the nucleus of WWE’s creative team, it’s no wonder why these are the decisions viewer witness week-to-week on WWE television. There is a major flaw in the logic of McMahon and Prichard in continuing to book characters like Asuka and Sasha Banks like this.

Firstly, these match outcomes worked with the NWA, Memphis, and Houston, because those promotions normally catered to live audiences and local television viewers with stars that weren’t featured each and every week. Often times, these territories didn’t use their big stars repeatedly on these large shows.

Sasha Banks
Photo credit: WWE.com

These top-tier stars were saved and utilized to attract a huge live crowd where the promoter could make an obscene amount of money on the gate alone. Sasha Banks and Bayley’s appearances have grown in frequency. As a result, they no longer feel like a special attraction act, but instead as an underwhelming expectation.

Also, when a promoter doesn’t allow a character to gain victories or losses, then the audience has no incentive to invest their time into them. People watch wrestling for the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat. Viewers want to revel in victory with their favorites or share in the devastation that comes with a loss.

In the end, no one will care about Asuka or Sasha Banks, because they aren’t winning or they aren’t losing. They simply exist. People don’t want to cheer or jeer someone for simply making an appearance. People want to cheer winners and admonish cheaters. What they are doing with Asuka and Sasha right now isn’t eliciting any of those reactions. When fans finally start filing back into arenas, don’t be surprised if the reactions are just as quiet as they are with empty seats.

What do you think? Let us know in the comment section below.

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